Did you know that even humans had horns?!
This might sound like a Stephen King books of science fiction horror, but it’s actually true. We’re developing the growth of horns in our skull because of too much glancing the look at out phone screens. These horns are actually bone spurs are actually developed by a prominent lower area of our skulls. In the […]

This might sound like a Stephen King books of science fiction horror, but it’s actually true.

We’re developing the growth of horns in our skull because of too much glancing the look at out phone screens. These horns are actually bone spurs are actually developed by a prominent lower area of our skulls.

In the study, conducted by Doctor David Shahar who hold a PhD in chiropractic and Associate Professor Mark Sayers from Queensland, Australia, it is scientifically proven and explained about the whole process and the interaction with smart phones, causing the process. 

It has been believed that the development of bone spurs, who was possible in young adults (since they have a higher level of ossein) was an extremely rare case.

These bone spurs are scientifically known as “enthesophytes”. After the examination of many x-rays, from people between 18 and 30 years of age, Dr. David shared his findings.

“Our findings raise a concern about the future musculoskeletal health of the young adult population and reinforce the need for prevention intervention through posture improvement education”. Furthermore, they explain that “ we believe there exists sufficient evidence - a direct link between

  • the “aberrant” mechanical loading caused by mobile device use, and
  • the anomalous growth rate of EEOP instances in young adults”.

After closely examining the x-rays and radiographs of about 220 patients, aged between 18 and 30 years, the scientists concluded that the images contain spur-like protrusion.

It is known in medicine that these bone structures lie “hidden” with a potential to grow in the bottom-rear of the skull.  The size of the bone spurs varied with the age of the patients, also, with their gender.

Older patients exhibited smaller enthesophyte - bone spurs size than younger patients. “a conundrum,” says the team, “as the frequency and severity of degenerative skeletal features in humans are associated typically with aging”.

The scientific explanation  is – the skeleton of the human body resists to external force, thus creating extra parts for that purpose. In this case, the skull and the nearest areas to the skull, such as the chin and the neck are in a maladaptive position.

Another problem that derives from the overuse of smart phones is a syndrome called “text neck”, explained in a study by the American chiropractor Dr. D.L. Fishman.

This syndrome arises from “tilting of the head while staring at handheld devices over a prolonged period”. The symptoms include:

  • A stuff neck
  • Tensioned headaches
  • Pain around the neck area
  • Muscle weakness in the shoulder area
  • Cervical spine compression
  • Loss of lung capacity
  • Spinal degeneration

So, to come to a conclusion. A series of studies talk about and have scientific proof of the damaging effects of digital addiction – both could be neurological and psychological.

It’s so obvious that young adults and even adolescents have a problem living a day without their smart phone. Should our free time activity become our long term addiction, causing health problems?

Sources: https://www.nbcnews.com/ https://www.dw.com/